Learning from the greats

I have devoted my life to learning and cultivating leadership principles and practices. I am mentored by John Maxwell and his world-renowned faculty in leadership, speaking, coaching, selling, teaching, training, communication, and behavioral analysis.

My learning journey has led me to discover that every human is designed for a purpose, that purpose is discoverable, and a life spent in pursuit of that purpose leads to significance and leaves a powerful legacy.

Learn how you can leverage my skills and training to grow your impact and leave your legacy. Click here to learn more.

The importance of knowing yourself

Today, I have two quotes to ponder. They go hand in hand and they both deal with the importance of self-clarity. Knowing and cooperating with your natural design is the most effective way to be successful and satisfied in your life.


“It is always easier to do right when you know, ahead of time, what you stand for.”

— Unknown


I am reminded of the airline safety presentation. During one part of the presentation, they talk about how oxygen masks will fall down in the event of a decompression. If you have ever been on a plane, you know that they tell you to ensure that you get your mask on before you help anyone else with theirs. They know that you can be of no use to anyone if you become compromised first. This is very logical and I think that given the opportunity to think it through, everyone would agree with the concept. So why include it in the safety briefing? The reason is simple. In the event of that emergency, most people will not be able to think that rationally. So when you know, ahead of time, what is important, you will be ready to make the right call in the tough moments when the pressure is on.


“No one can produce great things who is not thoroughly sincere in dealing with himself.”

— James Russell Lovell


Insincerity is noticeable. When someone is putting you on or shamming their way through life, it is evident. When you are insincere with yourself, you are be unavailable to add value to others. That’s all well and good but what does that insincerity look like? It looks like negative self-talk, a lack of humility, vanity, pride, and many other things. That seems discouraging but it’s not. We all have these moments and it is just in those moments, when that insincere self-interaction is occurring, that we are unavailable.

You were designed for a purpose. Knowing that purpose is an invaluable tool to maintaining a sincere and accurate self-image, which optimizes your availability for adding value. This reminds me of another quote. I know I said there were two but this one just sprang into my mind and it is very relevant. It is generally attributed to Albert Einstein.


“Everyone is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”


The fish that believes he is stupid because he can’t climb a tree has an inaccurate self-image and is not available to use his natural design to add value to others.

I think that every person should take a class in introspection and self-reflection so they can learn to recognize those moments when they are inadvertently being fish out of water pouting at the base of a tree. Unfortunately, this is not a class that you can take in school but one you must seek out and invest in for your own good and the good of those you can serve by using the genius that you were designed with. My coaching practice is that class where in I can labor along side you as you discover how to identify, articulate, cooperate with, and grow the genius that is your natural design.

If you feel like you’re flopping around at the base of a tree, reach out to me below and we can get you back in the water where you can swim strong.

Reflection Friday

They say that experience is the best teacher. There is also a saying that says, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.”

We have all seen and, dare I say, participated in that definition of insanity, haven’t we? For example, most of us have looked in the mirror at least once and thought, “I wish I was in better shape or thinner,” and then we go off and eat a giant greasy meal with dessert that has the daily calorie allowance for a rhino…day after day.

Another thing that many of us can relate to are times when we got great results one time and were unable to repeat those results in the future. At the very least, we may have ended up with inconsistent results and not known why.

So if experience is the best teacher, why do so many of us struggle in this cycle of insanity? Is it because even the best teacher sometimes can’t teach the worst student? Maybe. Or perhaps the more likely thing is that experience alone is not the teacher but rather what we do with that experience is.

Try this, “Experience, reflected upon, is the best teacher.” Now we’re cookin’ with gas. You see, when we take the time to sit and think about our experience and how our choices and actions affect our results, it is then that we begin to make the necessary cause and effect correlations. From these, we learn what works and what doesn’t and can intentionally repeat desired behaviors and abolish the negative ones.

So take a minute each day to think back on what worked and what didn’t in your day. This will help you get an idea for what you want to try tomorrow. Hopefully not the same thing if you didn’t get the results you want.